Hey, White College Kids: Can the Ferguson Police Get Some of That Kony 2012 Outrage?

Posted: Aug. 22 2014 2:56 PM
Originally Published at The Root

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A woman gestures during a peaceful protest Aug. 19, 2014, along a street in Ferguson, Mo., regarding the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown.MICHAEL B. THOMAS/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Remember #Kony2012? Of course you do. The social media campaign by Invisible Children against the war criminal leader of Uganda’s Lord’s Resistance Army is impossible to forget because of the way so many Americans—including many white Americans—came together and amplified the cause in the name of justice and human rights.

Invisible Children’s video was viewed 100 million times within six days. In a showing bigger even than the one for the ongoing “ice bucket challenge” for Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS, 3.7 million people committed to joining the Kony 2012 struggle. While ultimately unsuccessful in its stated goals of “ending war,” or “stopping the LRA and their leader,” #Kony2012 was effective in galvanizing deep support from white youth throughout the nation.

So, why not #FergusonPD2014?

In other words, why aren’t the same people who called out Joseph Kony demanding accountability from the Ferguson Police Department for its killing of Michael Brown when he was unarmed, and for its violation of peaceful protesters’ constitutional rights to assemble? Yes, it’s true that people of all backgrounds, including some young white activists, are actively involved in the protests in Ferguson. But why aren’t white college students latching on to this and revealing the same overwhelming “commitment” they did to the Kony “cause”?

As a college professor, I remember clearly that during the #Kony2012 campaign, they wanted the world to know that they were outraged by the atrocities going on in Uganda, or at least the atrocities said to be going on at some point in recent history. Why not a similar response to the atrocities going on outside St. Louis?

Because, sadly, this American tragedy doesn’t seem to have the right ingredients.

Besides using social media wisely, Invisible Children deployed a narrative of good versus evil and created enthusiasm around the power of young people in stopping a man intent on turning young men into soldiers and young women into sex slaves. With a click of a button that led the video to be shared on social media, a donation, or putting on some Kony apparel, one could seemingly purchase penance for past inaction and buy peace.

Second, the video and the campaign played upon the long-standing concept of the “white man’s burden” —the idea that white America has a responsibility and a duty to help oppressed elsewhere.

Third, the primary platform of the campaign limited the chance of cross-racial challenges. Facebook, marked by its insular communities, segregation and siloed realities, was the central engine for Kony 2012. This, and the nascent status of “black Twitter,” created conditions under which the “white savior” mentality thrived. While white Americans who participated in Kony 2012 were purchasing a tool kit or contributing to “justice” with their clicks and dollars, they didn’t have to inconvenience or challenge their privilege or identity.

Movements to address injustice when the victims are African American don’t have the same formula. So it’s no wonder that since 2012, there has not been a #Trayvon2013, a movement for #Renisha2013 or a #Ferguson2014. It’s no wonder there have been no viral videos on #Every28HoursABlackManIsKilled, or mainstream efforts to galvanize national attention for Eric Garner or Marissa Alexander or countless others.

Continue reading at The Root

6 thoughts on “Hey, White College Kids: Can the Ferguson Police Get Some of That Kony 2012 Outrage?

  1. So what if we did it differently. What would the narrative be that’s simple enough to tweet but respectful of the dynamics of Ferguson and especially honoring of Michael Brown’s life?

    • Why does it have to be about simplicity? One of the problems with KONY is its reliance on simplicity. I think we have seen many powerful online social media campaigns regarding Ferguson and elsewhere. Had white youth shared these protests, what might the impact be. But ultimately, it is about organizing

      • It’s all about organizing. Organizing for me demands complex analysis that can be expressed simply. That’s what works to get the word out, which point is to get folks on board and involved, so they can become engaged in the more complex analysis, make it their own so they organize others with integrity. White youth have shared some of these protests, but what you describe with KONY has a pretty crystal-sharp organizing message…I would love to see us choose one consciously as we move forward organizing to prevent Fergusons in the future. Btw, I love your angels post. Right on.

  2. Thank you; I don’t think kony was about organizing; it was about consumption and performance of outrage. Plus as I say, they were successful in imagining evil elsewhere and erasing any complicit. To deal with ferguson forces white youth to look inward and account for whiteness, anti black racism, colorblind racism. I think kony did not organize which helps us understand it’s own failing as well as why it compelled action as opposed to other injustices

    • I think of organizing as neutral, as good as its analysis, known by its fruits. So I think of KONY as organizing but just not the kind we might want. I like analyzing its failures as you say and how it did compel action so we can do it more the way we would like to see it.

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